Wednesday, March 19, 2008

Sam and Frodo

Did anyone else noticed that Sam's personality is different after Frodo and Sam seperate from the others. He seems more outspoken and doesn't act like a servant as he has before.

7 comments:

Erica W said...

I think that Sam knows the imporatance of the mission and once away from the others he becomes more involved in keeping the focus on getting the ring to it's destination. I think Sam can tell that carring the ring is a struggle for Frodo, but maybe doesnt't want to convey this to the others. It may weaken their faith in frodo's ability, so Sam takes on a more submissive role, but when the others aren't around he can step up as the wingman to the ring barrier.

Megan Becker said...

Yeah, I think that once they are off on their own he becomes more of Frodo's bodyguard, rather than a servant or companion. Like Erica said, he knows the importance of the mission and just wants to make sure that he and Frodo complete the mission to whatever end they may come to.

Heidi Harshman said...

It does seem that Sam turns into more of a body guard. I think up until this point, Sam has felt like he isn't necessarily a major 'player' in the mission given to destroy the ring. However, now with Sam and Frodo on their own, I think he may realize that if something happens to Frodo, he is the only one to take care of the situation. This most likely makes him feel like a more important part of the mission and makes him step up to his new duties.

Sarah Hoerner said...

Yes, he does seem more like a "body guard" in a sense, he actually wants to take on more of the roles to help Frodo. He may feel like he is the "better" decision maker maybe?

Heather Ater said...

I think part of his reason to take care of Frodo as a 'bodyguard' is that he knows that if something happens to Frodo then the task of taking the ring the rest of the way will be his alone. I don't think anyone would want to take that journey alone.

Danae said...

It seems to me that Sam is more talkative but still acts like Frodo's servant. He has a mind of his own but he always has (like when he had doubts about Strider after they first met him in Bree). I wonder if he's more talkative simply because he has more of a chance to talk without the others around. I mean, what kind of dialogue would Tolkien have without Sam's talking when there's only 3 characters (Frodo, Sam, and Gollum) instead of 9?

David Le said...

he's freer to open his mind in the presence of his master instead of bottling everything inside with the others. It's not that sam isn't used to men, dwarves, or elves i guess he isn't as comfortable talking openly with them present compared to his kin or kind.