Wednesday, April 23, 2008

Return of the Hobbits

I found it interesting that when the Hobbits returned to the Shire, their characters seem so much different than when they left. It is for obvious reasons of course, as they have been through so much.

Before, it seemed to me that they were all simple folk. Minding their own business, never looking for trouble, and tending to their gardens. Now they return with a renewed confidence, able to lead the rest of the Hobbits in an attack of the ruffians. Its interesting to me that none of the other Hobbits (at least up until this point) have noticed or commented on the changes in the Hobbit's personality.

Its also interesting that Rosie commented to Sam that Frodo may be in much danger and Sam should not leave him alone. I liked that Sam found humor in that, as he and Frodo had been through so much together already.

4 comments:

erin smith said...

This was probably one of my favorite parts of the book. I loved the fact that Merry and Pippin, who had been overshadowed as the "minor hobbit pair" were able to stand up and really take a lead. Even Sam was able to take charge. I guess it could go along with destiny in a way. The hobbits were meant to go on the journey and learn all they could so that they could return to the Saruman-effected shire and return it to what it should be.

Erica W said...

I have to agree, the hobbits have changed a lot. Everyone talks about how big Merry and Pippin have gotton and are now able to stand up for themselves. The use their new skills from battle to protect their own home.

soune said...

I think it is very interesting that Rosie is the one hobbit that comments on Frodo's change. She truly sees that there is something wrong with him. I think Sam knows that as well. He laughs it off because he knows that Frodo will be leaving him soon, and perhaps he does not want to think about that yet.

Lyndsey said...

I like that the changes in the hobbits are all seen as positive. None of the hobbits of the Shire look down upon the men for changing at all, in fact, they all seem to be proud of them (especially when they notcie the rowth of Merry and Pippin).